HKMDB Daily News

March 25, 2010

March 23, 2010

Filed under: News — Tags: , , , — dleedlee @ 2:18 pm

THR: Q and A: Andy Lau

His production outfit Focus Films, which made its name with the “Focus: First Cuts” initiative from 2005 that featured debuts of new directors across Asia including Ning Hao’s “Crazy Stone” (2006), now launches the HK$50 million ($6.4 million) six-film initiative “Focus Fight” with Derek Kwok’s “Gallants,” showcased in this year’s Hong Kong International Film Festival.

Screen Daily: Monga

Monga is a dynamic and powerfully impressive Taiwanese gangster film set against the stunning backdrop of Taipei of the 1980s as a group of teenagers become men as they fight to survive amongst the gangs that run the old Monga quarter of the city.

Variety: 1428

The title of Du Haibin’s striking documentary refers to the exact time (14:28) on May 12, 2008, when a massive 8.0 earthquake rocked China’s Sichuan province. Pic proceeds with virtually no exposition, except for the words supplied by survivors as they scramble to build a makeshift existence on the ruins. Visiting a devastated village 10 days and then 210 days after the quake, Du depicts, with immediacy and casual artistry, a wide range of human reactions to the natural and political aftershocks. Fascinating, beautifully crafted Venice prizewinner fully warrants an arthouse run.

4th Asian Film Awards 2010: Glitz, glam, and awkward moments

CRI: South Korean Film Named Best Asian Picture

CRI: Snapshots from the 2010 Asian Film Awards

CRI: Jia Zhangke’s Hometown Trilogy in Print Form

Lynn Xiong and Donnie Yen attend press conference for Ip Man 2

Donnie Yen

Lynn Xiong (Xinhua)

WSJ:Bruce Lee’s Mentor Gets Second Biopic (Ip Man 2)

CRI: Hong Kong Int’l Film Festival to Mark the 70th Anniversary of Bruce Lee’s Birth

China launches official English language film website
The Chinese government has announced that it will launch an official English-language website www.chinesefilms.cn to provide information on Chinese-language films and the Chinese film industry.

The website is co-established by the Film Bureau under State Administration of Radio, Film and Television (SARFT) and Chinese Radio International (CRI), a state-owned radio broadcast company which broadcasts radio programs globally outside of China.

China Film Promotion International (CFPI), a state-owned promotion and sales company under the China Film Group, and CRI website will be operating the website.

The website offers information such as news, reviews, interviews, industry information on Chinese-language films and Chinese film policies. Most of the industry information is about mainland Chinese companies or institutions while film news covers the greater China region including Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore and Malaysia. In the future, CFPI also plans to provide online Chinese film screenings, online forum, and a database on the website. (Screen Daily)

Chinesefilms.cn, the first foreign-language website of the Chinese mainland for promoting Chinese films, was officially launched at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center on March 23.


Lan poster

Lan to Debut in April



March 23, 2010

1428 (review)

Filed under: Reprints — Tags: , — dleedlee @ 11:45 am

1428
A DGenerate Films release of a CNEX Foundation production. Produced by Ben Tsiang, Du Haibin. Executive producers, Hsu Hsiao-ming, Ruby Chen. Directed by Du Haibin.

By RONNIE SCHEIB
The title of Du Haibin’s striking documentary refers to the exact time (14:28) on May 12, 2008, when a massive 8.0 earthquake rocked China’s Sichuan province. Pic proceeds with virtually no exposition, except for the words supplied by survivors as they scramble to build a makeshift existence on the ruins. Visiting a devastated village 10 days and then 210 days after the quake, Du depicts, with immediacy and casual artistry, a wide range of human reactions to the natural and political aftershocks. Fascinating, beautifully crafted Venice prizewinner fully warrants an arthouse run.
In part one, filmed 10 days post-quake, stunned survivors of Beichuan township mechanically go about the tasks at hand: Women scrub clothes and recount their children’s deaths; villagers sift through debris for remnants of their homes and businesses; men attack slabs of concrete with sledgehammers, working for hours to harvest small metal scraps and lengths of wire. The faithful mourn the destruction of a temple, staring in dismay at a toppled Buddha. A family searches a dormitory for the belongings of their young son, lost somewhere with his classmates beneath a crushed schoolhouse.

Part two, some seven months later, finds great changes for some and “temporary” chaos for others in Beichuan. Houses have been razed to make way for new lodgings and farmlands repurposed as the foundation for a huge concrete-manufacturing factory. Du focuses on a few families that, for whatever reason, slipped through the relocation cracks, still living in tents and jerry-built shacks.

Like Zhao Dayong (who made the more formalistic village study “Ghost Town”), director Du remains open to peripheral goings-on, no matter what his immediate focus. Slogans, banners, TV newscasts, impromptu group discussions and passersby who air their grievances to the camera form multiple layers of discourse, unmediated even by background music.

To the likely surprise of American auds, villagers speak openly, careful only to preface their grumblings with qualifications about the general goodness of the Communist Party. They discuss widespread allegations that shoddy school construction caused thousands of children’s deaths, and bemoan that while Beichuan received merely adequate refurbishments, the nearby village of Mao Er Shi got deluxe treatment, making it a photo-op showcase for rural renovation.

But politics form only one thread in Du’s tapestry — less important, perhaps, than the figure that haunts the film from first image to last, a homeless man clad in trailing rags, his hair uncombed, his feet bare. Alone among all the film’s subjects, he returns the mute gaze of the camera with a questioning, oddly serene look, like some errant muse gone mad. Mandarin dialogue

Camera (color, HD), Liu Ai’guo; editors, Mary Stephens, Du; music, Xu Chunsong, He Miaoshu; sound, Sun Yuanqiang. Reviewed at Documentary Fortnight, New York, March 1, 2010. (Also in 2009 Venice, Vancouver film festivals.) Running time: 117 MIN.
Variety

December 2, 2009

December 2, 2009

Shu Qi, Chang Chen, Kwai Lun-Mei help open a new LV shop in Macau with Pansy Ho.

Shu Qi

Kwai Lun-Mei

(Xinhua) (Sina) (cri.cn)

Karen Mok was in Shanghai to promote her upcoming concert.

(Xinhua)

Simultaneous Press Conferences for Hot Summer Days

Barbie Hsu

Nic Tse

Angelababy

Barbie Hsu, Nic Tse, Angelababy

Vivian Hsu

Vivian Hsu, Daniel Wu

Bobo

Wei Shiya

Director Chan Kwok-Fai

Producer Fruit Chan

Hot Summer Days cast and crew held joint press conferences in Hong Kong and Beijing. Nic Tse, Angelababy and Barbie attended in Hong Kong while costars Daniel Wu and Vivian Hsu held a simultaneous press conference in Beijing (Xinhua) (2) (Sina) (cri.cn)

Film Archive to hold conference on history of early Chinese cinema

Top Asian cameraman expresses distaste of digital

Cannes-winning Taiwanese cameraman Mark Lee Ping-bing says in an interview published in “A Poet of Light and Shadow” — a collection of his still photographs — that shooting in digital format takes away the artistry of camera work and lighting because you can immediately see your work on a display monitor and fix it — as opposed to waiting to develop the film.

CNN: ‘1428′ tells Sichuan quake survivors’ stories

Storm Warriors Singapore promotion tour

Aaron and Ekin are such Storm troopers

Aaron Kwok on theme song duet with Ekin Cheng: his singing is not bad

Ekin Cheng: “I’m a romantic”

‘Warriors’ storm into M’sia

Chinese actress Li Bingbing married since 1999?

CRI: Leon Lai, Michelle Reis Reunite on, off-screen

Lin Chi-ling voted actress with “most beautiful breasts”

Carina jealous after Maggie Cheung said she wanted to squeeze Tony’s thigh

Loletta’s back and sexier than ever

Ssshhh… we’re married

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