HKMDB Daily News

February 10, 2014

That Demon Within (Variety review)

Filed under: Reprints — Tags: , — dleedlee @ 3:45 pm

That Demon Within
FEBRUARY 9, 2014

Action auteur Dante Lam delivers his darkest work to date with this ghoulish supernatural thriller.

Maggie Lee

A psychodrama set amid funeral parlors, graveyards and creepy old tenement buildings, “That Demon Within” owes as much to Hong Kong’s vintage horror genre as it does to the strong noir style of Dante Lam’s superior cop thrillers “The Beast Stalker” and “The Stool Pigeon.” Working from a real-life criminal case but steeping it in ghoulish Chinese supernatural lore, the action auteur turns a policeman’s battle with a Jekyll-and-Hyde personality into an exploration of the evil instinct latent in everyone. The result is Lam’s darkest work to date, one where violence is not just graphic but ugly, and Hong Kong symbolically comes to resemble a charnel house. It should do gangbusters biz in Asian-friendly genre markets, though mainstream domestic audiences may not embrace the grim content as readily as they did his heartwarming 2013 hit, “Unbeatable.”

Set to open April 18 Stateside through China Lion, “That Demon Within” recalls Lam’s “Fire of Conscience” (2010) in the way it draws on fading Hong Kong folk-religious icons in service of a retro aesthetic. Here, Lam invokes the Demon King, a spirit that is associated with the Festival of Hungry Ghosts and, like the fire dragon in “Conscience,” reps a manifestation of one’s inner darkness.

Shrouded in mystery and superstition from the outset, the film opens with a gang of robbers, known as the Demon King Gang, preparing for a heist by burning incense to their chosen idol — a subversion of a scene familiar from other Hong Kong thrillers, in which police and triads alike pray to Guan Yu, the deity of righteousness. Led by Broker (Liu Kai-chi), the crooks get into a loot dispute with freelance thug Hon Kong (Nick Cheung), who is subsequently injured in a police ambush.

Hon stumbles into a hospital where beat cop Dave (Wu), unaware of his identity, gives him a life-saving blood transfusion — to the chagrin of Inspector “Pops” Mok (Lam Kar-wah), who’s bent on putting the gang behind bars before his imminent retirement. Racked with guilt over having saved a man who callously killed his comrades, Dave starts to hallucinate about Hon merging with him as one; upon learning of Hon’s escape, he believes it’s his destiny to track down and destroy his malevolent alter ego.

Meanwhile, Dave’s supervisor Liz (Christie Chen, cold and stiff), notices that despite his faultless performance, he’s been passed over for promotion and shuffled around precincts due to “personality issues.” She enlists her therapist sister, Stephanie (Astrid Chan), to counsel him, unwittingly opening a psychiatric Pandora’s Box during their hypnosis sessions. Dave’s dramatic arc hinges on a mystery related to his unusually close relationship with his ailing grandmother (Fung So-bor) and his traumatic upbringing by a didactic and sadistically strict father (Chi Kuan-chun).

Lam’s best works have always infused action with stirring emotion, and the fight scenes here, though topnotch, are not even the driving force in what is essentially a character study — an anatomy of a tortured sinner who disturbingly resorts to ritual self-flagellation as a form of anger management. Fire is a key leitmotif (no coincidence that the Demon King is also known as “Spirit of the Burning Face”), as visions of human immolation — which could be flashbacks or nightmares — overlap with Hon’s apparition goading Dave into expressing his savage instincts, dragging him into a sort of mental inferno. Images of swirling blank ink dissolving in water stylishly express the character’s fears and gradual corruption.

Although the film was reportedly inspired by notorious police officer Tsui Po-ko, who robbed banks and murdered his colleagues, Lam has shaped his protag as a tragic figure struggling to hold onto his identity and values. Frequently framed in his squalid housing estate, a lonely prisoner behind metal gates and sealed windows, Dave elicits real sympathy. Wu is initially buttoned-up in a way that recalls his past persona as a heartthrob in numerous romances, but he steadily invests the character with palpable pain and unease, as well as an increasingly gaunt, cadaverous physicality. And even as Dave’s mental condition deteriorates, Lam maintains a riveting ambiguity about Hon, whose terrifying presence suggests that demonic possession is not entirely out of the question; though Cheung takes up less screentime than his co-star, his demonic grin all but devours the screen.

The film achieves a truly Stygian vision through the excesses of the Demon King gang, as Dave, under the apparent influence of Hon, sows seeds of doubt among Broker and his cohorts (Lee Kwok-lun and Stephen Au). But these men need little prompting to stab each other in the back, consumed as they are by greed, and smugly unrepentant as they are about their crimes. Theirs is a profession rooted in the moribund world of undertakers and cremators, and production designer Lee Kin-wai conjures a suitably chilling mise-en-scene of funeral parlors, morgues, coffins and arcane rituals. The banality of such evil is neatly captured by Liu as Broker, dialing down his performance to a very pragmatic level of malice.

Tech credits are exemplary, with particular kudos to car stunt designer Thomson Ng for a Grand Guignol gas-station finale with a blazing symbol of hell as its centerpiece. The primarily nocturnal backdrop takes on a nebulous glow in d.p. Kenny Tse’s subtly lit lensing, though blacks dominate the alternately richly saturated and wanly sepia images. Under the editorial supervision of Hong Kong New Wave stalwart Patrick Tam, Curran Pang’s seamless dissolves and complex montages blur the lines between imagination and reality, while Leo Ko’s unnerving score alludes to Chinese ceremonial performances with its drum and gong combinations.

Berlin Film Review: ‘That Demon Within’
Reviewed at Berlin Film Festival (Panorama), Feb. 8, 2013. Running time: 111 MIN. Original title: “Mor king”

Production
(Hong Kong-China) A Emperor Motion Pictures (in Hong Kong)/China Film Group (in China)/China Lion Film Distribution (in U.S.) release of an Emperor Film Prod. Co., Sil-Metropole Organization presentation of a Film Fireworks production. (International sales: Emperor Motion Pictures, Hong Kong.) Produced by Albert Lee, Ren Yue, Candy Leung. Executive producers, Albert Yeung, Song Dai. Co-producers, Cheung Hong-tat, Stephen Lam.

Crew
Directed by Dante Lam. Screenplay, Jack Ng, Lam, based on the story by Lam. Camera (color, widescreen, HD), Kenny Tse; supervising editor, Patrick Tam; editor, Curran Pang; music, Leo Ko; production designer, Lee Kin-wai; costume designer, Stephanie Wong; sound (Dolby Surround 7.1), Phyllis Cheng; re-recording mixer, Phyllis Cheng; special effects supervisor, Chi Shui-tim; visual effects supervisors, Ho Kwan-yeung, Alex Lim Hun-fung, Lin Chun-yue, Yee Kwok-leung; visual effects, Free-D Workshop; stunt choreographer, Philip Kwok, Ku Huen-chiu; car stunt choreographer, Thomson Ng; assistant directors, Jay Cheung, Jeff Cheung; second unit camera, Samuel Fu Ga-yu.

With
Daniel Wu, Nick Cheung, Liu Kai-chi, Christie Chen, Fung So-bor, Lam Kar-wah, Andy On, Astrid Chan, Lee Kwok-lun, Stephen Au, Leung Cheuk-moon, Chi Kuan-chun. (Cantonese dialogue)

Variety

February 9, 2014

The Midnight After (Variety review)

Filed under: Reprints — Tags: , — dleedlee @ 3:11 pm

The Midnight After
FEBRUARY 8, 2014
Maggie Lee

Fruit Chan makes a delirious return to form with this macabre action-thriller.

A Hong Kong without traffic jams and crowds is a phenomenon eerier than any alien invasion or zombie outbreak, and it’s what the passengers of a minibus have to cope with when they find themselves the survivors of a strange pandemic in “The Midnight After,” a deliriously high-concept and gleefully low-budget horror-comedy that mourns the dissolution of the city’s core values since its handover to China in 1997. Maverick helmer Fruit Chan (“Made in Hong Kong,” “Durian Durian”) bends genre like it’s putty in his hands, distilling the macabre from the everyday and making the apocalyptic seem absurdly matter-of-fact. Fest play is assured, and ancillary prospects in overseas Asian-friendly niches look hopeful.

Since the wickedly grotesque “Dumplings” (2004), the once-prolific Chan has dabbled in short and medium-length films that suggested he might have lost his creative edge. But by adapting Pizza’s “Lost on a Minibus From Mongkok to Taipo,” a Web novel that went viral, Chan has found an ideal vehicle for his deep affinity for his city’s culture. Referencing everything from SARS to “cha chaan teng” (local diners), and even a veiled connection between Fukushima and the Daya Bay nuclear power plant in neighboring Shenzhen, “The Midnight After” reps a hodgepodge of what defines the Hong Kong experience. Blithely unconcerned with subtlety, coherence or the Chinese market, the film sizzles with untranslatable colloquial wisecracks, trenchant social satire, and an ensemble cast of character actors and young up-and-comers at their freaky best. A mercurial ride that is decidedly outside the mainstream, it should nonetheless delight genre aficionados and bonafide fans of Hong Kong cinema.

While playing mahjong, porky minibus driver Suet (Johnnie To regular Lam Suet) gets called in to cover a friend’s night shift from Mongkok to Tai Po, in exchange for deferred payment of a debt. At 2:28 a.m., the red, 16-seat vehicle is filled up and sets out from Kowloon’s busiest urban center for the satellite town in the New Territories. While passing through a tunnel, they sense something is amiss, and sure enough, when they emerge on the other sides, the roads are empty and their destination has become a ghost town.

Four college students become the first of the travelers to succumb to the invisible virus that’s killed everyone else in the city; once the reality of what’s happened dawns on the remaining 13 passengers, some offer interpretations ranging from the improbable to the ridiculous. Their reactions subtly reveal different personal traits, as when the clairvoyant Sister Ying (Kara Hui, insidiously controlling) slips a life-insurance sales pitch into her Photon Belt prophecy.

Cool-headed programmer Shun (Chui Tien-you) manages to decode a mysterious siren that they’ve all heard on their cell phones, cuing a sidesplitting rendition of David Bowie’s “Space Oddity” by an onboard dweeb (played by Jan Curious, vocalist for the math-rock band Chochukmo). The performance of the 1969 song not only serves as the film’s comic high point but also underscores its themes of exile and death, capturing the estrangement that Hong Kong residents often feel from their rapidly changing homeland.

As the characters disperse and regroup, Chan exploits the mass-panic scenario for farce as well as terror, with an original mash-up of epidemic/zombie/sci-fi horror elements that makes “Contagion” and the “REC” franchise look square by comparison. Dream sequences and spooky visions further add to the surreal atmosphere, and the revelation of each character’s dark side culminates in a highly political message about the loss of morality and compassion following a critical transition, as symbolized by their passing through the tunnel. Chan leavens the heavier dialogue scenes with a few punchy action sequences en route to a big-bang finish at once funny, sad, allegorical and provocatively open-ended.

It’s hard to invest such a large raft of characters with much psychological depth or backstory, but the actors manage to come across as quirky yet believably ordinary. Simon Yam stands out as a scuzzy hood, while Chan fixture Sam Lee is always on hand to lighten thing up as a stupefied cokehead. A pleasant surprise is actress-model Janice Man, who morphs from blandly pretty at the outset to skin-crawling by film’s end.

Chan, who’s known for his frugal production values, again makes every penny count, packaging cheap sci-fi elements with high camp, and generating shivers with a mix of real interiors and unglamorous street scenery. His regular d.p. Lam Wah-tsuen handled the guerrilla-style handheld camerawork, complemented by oppressive sound design and edgy music.

Berlin Film Review: ‘The Midnight After’
Reviewed at Berlin Film Festival (Panorama), Feb. 7, 2014. Running time: 123 MIN. Original title: “Na ye ling san ngor jor seung liu wongkok hoi wong daibo dik hung van”

Production
(Hong Kong) A Golden Scene Co. release of a Golden Scene Co., the Film Development Fund of Hong Kong presentation of a Midnight After Film Prod., One Ninety Films production in association with Sun Entertainment Culture. (International sales: Fortissimo Films, Amsterdam.) Produced by Amy Chin. Executive producer, Winnie Tsang, Fruit Chan.

Crew
Directed by Fruit Chan. Screenplay, Chan Fai-hung, Kong Ho-yan, Chan, based on the web novel “Lost on a Minibus From Mongkok to Taipo” by Pizza. Camera (color, widescreen, HD), Lam Wah-tsuen; editors, Tin Sup Fat, Toto; music, Ellen Loo, Veronica Lee; production designer, Andrew Wong; costume designer, Phoebe Wong; sound (Dolby Surround 5.1), Benny Chu; visual effects, Different Digital Design; stunt choreographer, Jack Wong; associate producer, Alex Dong; assistant directors, Chan Wai-keung, Nikki Lau.

With
Lam Suet, Simon Yam, Kara Hui, Chui Tien-you, Wong You-nam, Janice Man, Sam Lee, Jan Curious, Vincci Cheuk, Lee Sheung-ching, Cherry Ngan, Kelvin Chan, Endy Chow, Melody Mak. (Cantonese dialogue)

Variety

February 8, 2014

The Midnight After (Screen Daily review)

Filed under: Reprints — Tags: , , — dleedlee @ 4:55 pm

The Midnight After
8 February, 2014
By Flossie Topping

The Midnight After is a quirky apocalyptic horror from Hong Kong indie director Fruit Chan, who returns to the Panorama section after his success with Dumplings, which premiered in 2005.

Adapting the web-series turned best-selling novel Lost On A Red Mini Bus To Tai Po by a writer who goes by the pen name “Pizza”, we follow 17 Hong Kongers as they travel by night bus to Tai Po, a market town on the outskirts of the city. Things become mysterious when the bus passes through a tunnel, and emerges into a completely deserted street. The group soon starts to question whether they may be the last 17 people alive.

Set against a backdrop of neon lights and whizzing traffic, Chan and cinematographer Lam Wah-tsuen successfully capture the bustling city in all its glory. However, it is the diversity of characters that make the film so engaging, trapping together a potbellied gambler (Lam Suet) a cokehead (Sam Lee, Made in Hong Kong) and a psychic insurance saleswoman (Kara Hui), to discuss their fate in an abandoned Michelin-starred restaurant.

Black comedy comes in bursts when the characters start to be killed off in odd circumstances, some contracting the plague and others simply turning to stone and crumbling into dust. Odder still, the group find that the only clue that they’ve been given from their enemy is the lyrics to David Bowie’s Space Oddity, sent to them in Morse code on their phones.

Fans of Chan’s will warm to his unique sense of humour and many pop culture references, such as having his characters play Candy Crush and air guitar with a mop, but to a wider audience, the randomness of events and gratuitous violence may leave them pining for a more fixed genre or plot structure. The Midnight After may be best suited to a domestic audience.

In his earlier films, Chan made numerous references to Hong Kong’s relationship to China and its burgeoning identity. This too, carries on with that theme, delivering a distinct local flavor whilst also throwing in commentary about Hong Kong’s zombie-like masses and the lasting effects of the SARS virus and the 2011 nuclear meltdown in Fukushima, Japan. During the film we are told “Hong Kong doesn’t do sci-fi”, but Chan has successfully defied genre conventions here.

Production companies: The Midnight After Film Production, One Ninety Films Co.

International sales: Fortissimo Films

Producer: Amy Chin

Executive producers: Winnie Tsang, Fruit Chan

Screenplay: Chan Fai-hung, Kong Ho-yan, Fruit Chan, based on the novel “Lost on a Red Minibus to Taipo,” by Pizza

Cinematography: Lam Wah-tsuen

Editors: TinSupFat, ToTo

Production designer: Andrew Wong

Music: Ellen Loo, Veronica Lee

Cast: Wong You-nam, Janice Man, Simon Yam, Kara Hui, Chui Tien-you, Lam Suet, Cheuk Wan-chi, Lee Sheung-ching, Sam Lee, Cherry Ngan, Melodee Mak, Jan Curious, Ronny Yuen, Kelvin Chan, Endy Chow
Screen Daily

The Midnight After (Hollywood Reporter review)

Filed under: Reprints — Tags: , — dleedlee @ 2:42 pm

The Midnight After
2/7/2014 by David Rooney

The Bottom Line
The chaotic transition of Hong Kong is fodder for suspense- and scare-free horror in this tiresome comic strip of urban cataclysm.

Seventeen random souls are thrown together in a public transport vehicle that somehow gets spared when the rest of humanity vanishes in Fruit Chan’s genre blender.

Fruit Chan made his name as a director with a series of provocative independent films in the late 1990s that commented on the handover of Hong Kong sovereignty to China. But he stumbles with The Midnight After, an indigestible post-apocalyptic stir-fry that sacrifices any sociopolitical allegory about reunified Hong Kong and its place in 21st century Asia to wild tonal inconsistency and clumsy genre mishmash. Adapted from a popular novel about the last 17 people in a suddenly vacated city inhabited by millions, this toxic mess works neither as broad satirical comedy nor as sci-fi horror, which are the two stylistic camps where it loiters longest.

The source material, Lost on a Red Minibus to Tai Po, originated as serialized web fiction by an anonymous writer who goes by the pen name Pizza, before being published as a novel in 2012. The appearance of the word “lost” in the title may be a nod to the ABC television series of that name, given that the characters find themselves in an alternate universe full of malevolent threats and disorienting dreams of pre-disaster life, seemingly with an inexplicable time lapse. But the mysteries as depicted here are too convoluted to invite much scrutiny.

Chan and cinematographer Lam Wah-tsuen effectively capture the human cacophony of one of the world’s most densely populated areas in a fast-motion opening that provides a quick glimpse of the key characters in frenetically cut establishing scenes.

A slobby loudmouth gambler (Lam Suet) gets a late-night call to fill in for a minibus driver friend on a route to Tai Po, a former market town turned new community. His passengers are played by a mix of Chan regulars, veteran Hong Kong actors and new-generation stars. The group includes a cokehead, a bickering married couple, a blowhard failed gangster, a fortune-telling insurance broker, a tech expert, a vintage vinyl dealer, an incognito thief, a bottle-blond pretty boy stood up by his girlfriend, a matching female counterpart and a handful of college students.

The first bad omen is an accident they pass in which a couple that almost boarded the bus has been killed. But the major mind-bender occurs when they travel through a tunnel and all the other traffic vanishes, emerging on the other side to find a ghost town. Phone signals are dead, Internet activity has frozen, and as panic mounts among the passengers, the fortune-teller (Kara Hui) starts spouting theories about having entered the Photon Belt, where their destinies are now intertwined.

The loss of spirituality, the escalation of economic instability, the squandering of cultural wealth, the emergence of a drug-addled “zombie” race, disillusionment with the political system, distrust of technology and depersonalization of society are among the countless half-baked themes touched upon as people start combusting or crumbling like rocks. Not to mention raping and maiming.

The chief clues about their limbo come from an unknown caller’s coded message that links to David Bowie’s “Space Oddity,” a song then heard multiple times, evoking space travel and imperiled isolation; and the appearance of a young Japanese man in a gas mask, who summons associations with the SARS epidemic and makes oblique references to the nuclear meltdown at Fukushima. But rather than solving the enigma, the film is more concerned with acknowledging all that’s at risk of being lost in the relentless march forward, suggesting not just traditional laws and ethics but ultimately humanity itself.

With a more controlled director at the helm, that strand might have acquired some poignancy. But The Midnight After is all over the place, lurching from goofball comedy to pulpy horror to mawkish melodrama as young leads Wong You-nam and Janice Man mentally revisit their romances. Even with a fuller understanding of all the local references, this would doubtless still be an overblown, noisy, curiously inept movie from a filmmaker who shows only fleeting command of the material.

Early on, one of the minibus passengers warns that splitting up is how folks get killed in horror movies, while later, somebody remarks that Hong Kong doesn’t do sci-fi. But there’s precious little wit in the film’s attempt to upend genre conventions. The most interesting thing about it is seeing vast expanses of the digitally evacuated city, an image that says a lot more than any of the yappy characters.

Venue: Berlin Film Festival (Panorama Special)
Production companies: The Midnight After Film Production, One Ninety Films Co.
Cast: Wong You-nam, Janice Man, Simon Yam, Kara Hui, Chui Tien-you, Lam Suet, Cheuk Wan-chi, Lee Sheung-ching, Sam Lee, Cherry Ngan, Melodee Mak, Jan Curious, Ronny Yuen, Kelvin Chan, Endy Chow
Director: Fruit Chan
Screenwriters: Chan Fai-hung, Kong Ho-yan, Fruit Chan, based on the novel “Lost on a Red Minibus to Taipo,” by Pizza
Producer: Amy Chin
Executive producer: Winnie Tsang, Fruit Chan
Director of photography: Lam Wah-tsuen
Production designer: Andrew Wong
Music: Ellen Loo, Veronica Lee
Costume designer: Phoebe Wong
Editors: TinSupFat, ToTo
Sales: Fortissimo Films
No rating, 123 minutes
THR

July 30, 2009

July 30, 2009


New Sophie’s Revenge poster


Zhang Ziyi

More stills - Sophie’s Revenge


Tracing Shadow poster

Recent posts from Bey Logan’s blog
Bey Logan: Chow on Fire
Fat Gor tries to change a flat tire/tyre

Bey Logan: Coffee with Gong Li
Gong dominated Chinese cinema to such an extent that, when she proved unavailable for the project, Chen Kaige begrudgingly began his film Temptress Moon with another actress, Iron Monkey’s Jean Wang, before summarily dismissing her when Gong Li did become available (and then, rather unkindly, criticizing Wang in the press.)

Bey Logan: The Man With The Deadly Pen
Ngai Hong (AKA Ni Kuang) (and Vivian Chow’s father-in-law)

Guardian: Can Kung Fu Cyborg kick Transformers’ arse?

Shu Qi performing action stunts on City Under Siege - slide show

Fruit Chan
Chengdu, I Love You
Fruit Chan’s Chengdu, I Love You to close Venice Film Festival


Xiao Shenyang
Sun Honglei
Zhang Yimou’s Three Guns

Li Bingbing was admitted to the hospital with heat stroke and hospitalized for two days but has now returned to the set of Detective Dee
on.cc

Chow Yun-Fat possibly joining the cast of Jiang Wen’s Let the Bullets Fly

The woman who changes one man’s destiny - Michelle Reis
“If a woman can change a man’s whole life, that’s an attractive story to me,” the 39-year-old says. “My role encourages a beggar to stand up to hardship and live with dignity and confidence. She makes me believe in love.”

Qin Hailu

Qin Hailu to star in Sun Zhou’s 1949 war drama set in Guangzhou

Kelly Chen

Hong Kong media is reporting that Kelly Chen is not getting along with her mother-in-law

Supposedly clashing over cooking and child care
http://ent.sina.com.hk/cgi-bin/nw/show.cgi/2/3/1/301496/1.html


Zhao Wei releasing new album on digital platform via China Mobile (a la Karen Mok) in August

Rumor: Zhao Wei has registered for marriage in Singapore to a businessman
She was spotted with a wealthy merchant outside a marriage registration office in Singapore. To register in Singapore one must be a Singaporean or a permanent resident of Singapore.
If so, can a change in citizenship be far behind? :)
http://www.businesstimes.com.hk/a-20090730-24326/zhaowei12
http://news.sina.com.tw/article/20090730/1976875.html



Liu Ye promoting auto brand

First public appearance since marriage

Pace Wu

Pace Wu in Taipei promoting cosmetics - gallery


Paris Hilton dons a Hello Kitty dress

Group wants to stub out film smoke
Chinese anti-smoking group call for a ban on smoking scenes

Hong Kong gang convicted for piracy
Leader sentenced to 74 months; $1.1 mil in assets seized

July 29, 2009

July 29, 2009


Lau Ching-Wan and wife,Amy KwokLau Ching-Wan, Zhang Jingchu, Alex Fong

Daniel Wu, Louis Koo, Lau Ching-WanDaniel Wu

Anita YuenMichelle Ye

Overheard cast and guests attend Hong Kong premiere
Michael Wong and wife
Michael Wong and wife


“Overheard” Premieres in Hong Kong
Hollywood Reporter: Alan Mak hopes for hit in China

‘Chengdu’ to close Venice festival
Fruit Chan, Cui Jian unveil sci-fi film
Chengdu, I Love You to close Venice Film Festival
[ I wonder, did the third part get cut out because Hur Jin-ho expanded his segment to a full length feature?]
Previously: Hur Jin-ho wraps feature-length Season Of Good Rain
‘Chengdu’ to Close Venice Film Festival

Variety: SPC to distribute Yimou’s ‘Blood’ [Amazing Tales: Three Guns]
Sony Pictures Classics is continuing its relationship with filmmaker Zhang Yimou, agreeing to distribute his planned remake of the Coen brothers’ comedic thriller “Blood Simple” domestically and in several major foreign territories
Screen Daily: Sony Classics on board for Zhang Yimou’s Blood Simple remake

China welcomes ‘Haeundae’ wave
Korean disaster film looks for success onshore in China

Lee Byung-hun Returns With Film ‘G.I. Joe’
Kwon Sang-woo May Make Hollywood Debut
Hollywood’s Korean ninjas
Sandra Ng
Barbie Hsu
Sandra Ng and Barbie Hsu - On His Majesty’s Secret Service

Xu Fan and husband Feng Xiaogang
Chen Daoming, Chen Jin

Does Feng Xiaogang have vitiligo?

Aftershock officially launches production

Ceremony held at Tangshan Earthquake Memorial Square

HK actress Michelle Reis returns to the big screen

Anthony Wong
Anthony Wong, Yin Tao to Lead Epic Tang Drama

Jia Zhangke: In fact it is the President of the World Uighur Congress Kadeer, a documentary film, and invited me to attend the film premiere, it is known that political figures in the film will appear, too political, and I am not sure about the history of Xinjiang, so it is not the time to attend the film festival a good time, so I choose not to participate. ”
Jia Zhangke speaking at the Hong Kong Book Fair

Jet Li’s Singapore citizenship confirmed

Shing Fui-On (file photo)
Shing Fui-On gives a thumbs up

Young Shing Fui-On and Andy Lau
Shing Fui-On’s cancer has spread to his lungs. He entered the hospital last week and only weighs 45kgs (not lost 45kgs as previously reported)


86 year-old Lam Kau enters hospital with foot injury

Nick Cheung
Nick Cheung films a tourism program in Finland


Vivian Chow
Peter Chan
I spy: Vivian Chow secretly meeting with Peter Chan in Shanghai

Sparks rumors of plans for comeback

England: Family made £7m in fake DVD scam

July 16, 2009

July 16, 2009

Hollywood Reporter: Murderer review
Bottom Line: A horror-suspense with a head-scratching outcome.

Hollywood Reporter: Wong Jing to live and die with ‘Mongkok’
Throwback film To Live and Die in Mongkok now shooting, set for late 2009 release.
“As long as the budget is not too high, we want to finance our own films that preserves the distinct flavor of Hong Kong cinema,” added Wong

Stellar Megamedia boards Dennis Chan’s 37
Chan’s 37 tells the story of a single mother taking her daughter on a trip to the Mongolian grasslands to fulfil the girl’s dream. It also stars Lin Miao-ke, the 10-year-old girl who earned her fame singing Ode To The Motherland at the opening ceremony of Beijing Olympic Games. (Also, see Charlie Yeung articles below)

Poker King with Louis Koo, Lau Ching-Wan, Stephy Tang filming in Macau

Fruit Chan
Fruit Chan announced plans to make ‘Kowloon City’ a story about the young Bruce Lee

Chan will write, direct and produce and Lin Chi-Shiang will co-write. The biggest problem is to find the person who will play Bruce Lee because at least five similar in appearance is required.
Stanley Kwan had previously announced plans for his film about Bruce Lee but Chan was not concerned about this.
yule.tom.com

Ge You ‘Gasps’ out Funny English

Fan Bingbing film Wheat directed by He Ping - slide show

Just for laughs - Michael Hui
Michael Hui’s Comedy Talk Show In Malaysia

Nicholas Tse encourages wife to have second child

Fan Bingbing Graces Bazaar August Issue

Stars Gather for Charity Concert
Gigi Leung, Miriam Yeung, Angie Chiu, Kenny Bee

Zhang Ziyi Elle magazine slide show



Shu Qi films a bath gel advert


Charlie Yeung
Charlie Yeung cut her hair for an upcoming role in film ‘37′ to be shot in Mongolia with Mainland actress Liu Xiaoqing. [Wonder if that means Christmas Rose is completed.] She had planned to auction hair off for charity but feared the hair would be used for other purposes.

Charlie Yeung sports new short hair, video

More photos


Kelly Chen’s baby Chace photos




Edison Chen leaves Taiwan

Wang Jie
The Stage Is Set for Jackson Imitator

June 19, 2009

June 19, 2009

Lau Ching-Wan
Lau Ching-Wan - Written By directed by Wai Ka-Fai

Misses premiere in New York due to fear of H1N1 flu

Aaron Kwok
Aaron Kwok - Murderer

Janine Chang, Aaron Kwok


Murderer


Overheard with Lau Ching-Wan, Daniel Wu and Louis Koo on summer schedule


MacDull’s latest McDull Wudang (aka McDull Kung Fu Kindergarten) opens July 24

Sandra Ng and Anthony Wong will voice for the Cantonese version

Taipei Times: The odd couple
‘If You are the One’ raked in roughly US$50 million at the end of last year in China, making it the country’s biggest box-office hit ever

Don’t Bank on It: a Film about Old China’s ‘Wall Street’
Taiwan tycoon Terry Guo has a special affinity for Shanxi Province as his parents lived there before they went to Taiwan in 1949. His roots inspired his first invested film, “Empire of Silver.”


In Theater: ‘The Magic Aster’ (”Ma Lan Hua”)

Fan Bingbing
Fan Bingbing - Media conference for East Wind Rain



Danny Boyle chides China on restrictions
‘Slumdog’ director calls limits ‘regrettable’


Hong Kong director takes swipe at film censors

Fruit Chan said he still wanted to make horror films, but the authorities would never approve the topic. Moreover, “investors no longer like a film that can only be screened in Hong Kong,” he said.

Young-seok Noh’s “Daytime Drinking” is a droll minimalist comedy with major insights that has been understandably heralded as a breakthrough in independent filmmaking in Korea. A great-looking film made for a mere $20,000…

Shu Qi
Shu Qi


Shu Qi appears on TV program

Taipei Times: Pop Stop

Leon Lai

Leon Lai windsurfs to stay fit for upcoming concert

Miriam Yeung
Miriam Yeung at opening ceremony for watch store

Gillian Chung
Gillian Chung leaves Malaysia ahead of Edison’s arrival

Finishing a three day ad shoot, Gillian departs before Edison opens a new branch of his clothing store. Earlier, it was reported that Gillian had blocked SMS from Edison who was trying to arrange a make up dinner.


Vivian Hsu in her newest ad

Cherie ChungBrigitte Lin
Vivian ChowJoey Wang now living in Vancouver, Canada
Seven beauties highly anticipaged film comebacks

A-Mei’s Music “Transformation”
A-mei: Charity work rejuvenates me

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