HKMDB Daily News

June 5, 2013

So Young (Hollywood Reporter review)

Filed under: Reprints — Tags: , , — dleedlee @ 12:22 pm

So Young

6/5/2013 by Elizabeth Kerr

Before Peter Chan took a nostalgic and a selective tour through the 1980s in American Dreams in China, actress Zhao Wei (Shaolin Soccer, Red Cliff, Painted Skin) dominated Mainland box offices with her $100 million-plus grossing So Young, a similarly themed look back at China’s rambunctious early 1990s, when economic reforms were sweeping the country and the future was changing minute to minute. Anchored by an engaging performance by Yang Zishan in her first lead role, Zhao’s film proves the actress turned director adept with images and actors. She has constructed what would have been called a “women’s picture” in the 1950s that has nonetheless tapped an underserved market. Curiosity regarding Zhao’s directorial debut could lead to moderate success in the region but Asia-focused festivals will be So Young’s primary audience.

So Young begins with engineering student Zheng Wei (Yang) heading to the (unnamed) big city to attend university and join her childhood buddy and sweetheart Lin Jing (Han Geng), only to find he’s left the country. Now independent and in a new environment, she drinks away her woes one evening with her new roommates in the dorm: class beauty Ruan Guan (Jiang Shuying), nitpicky Li Weijuan (Zhang Yao) who’s all about keeping up appearances and Zhu Xiaobei (Liu Yase), the resident tomboy who could be read as a lesbian (she has short hair after all, a classic movie symbol of sexuality). They become fast friends and create their own support network for the various trials and tribulations they face. As is typical of movies about women coming into maturity, each has her boy troubles.

Aside from being surreptitiously dumped, Zhang Wei has a suitor in persistent rich kid Xi Kaiyang (Zheng Kai), but fixates on standoffish architecture major Chen Xiaozheng (Taiwanese actor Mark Chao, Monga). Their relationship serves as the narrative core, but describing it as odd would be an understatement. After Xiaozheng insults Zheng Wei’s dignity (he gave her a shove after she tinkered with a model while in his room), she begins a campaign to actively humiliate him before moving on to stalking. It’s supposed to be charming and feisty, and Xiaozheng is supposed to be cold and unlikeable, but it’s hard seeing her behavior as less than obnoxious. Evidently he thinks it’s charming because they eventually fall madly in love, and his decision to go to the United States devastates her.

Zhao and screenwriter Li Qiang, who adapted Xin Yiwu’s novel To Our Youth That Is Fading Away (the English title is a reference to a song from Brit-pop band Suede’s first record), do a nice job of illustrating the bond between the four young women as well as recreating the time period with help from production designer Li Yang; it feels like the early-’90s, with the exception of a lack of black attire for the Suede fans. Zheng Wei is an effective manifestation of the changes within China at the time, moving from timid new kid to confident, experienced woman. Though the other characters are sketchier, they’re sketched with pinpoint precision that’s underpinned by the actresses. Zhang gives Weijuan’s fastidiousness nuanced, empathetic meaning that also proves generous in nature, and Jiang sneakily gives Ruan Guan the kind of depth rarely afforded the pretty girl archetype. Only Liu, whose big moment comes when she takes her rage out on shop owner that insulted her dignity (more insults) by assuming she’s a thief, remains a bit of a question mark. If it’s the short hair that led to the thieving accusations it raises the specter of LGBT discrimination, but it’s an issue that remains on the periphery. Unfortunately the male characters don’t fare as well, with a late film surge by the blustery Zhang Kai (Bao Beier) the sole exception.

But then So Young makes a sudden three-year jump. As the decisions of youth come back to haunt the women, the optimism of the past gives way to the compromise and disappointment of the present. Ruan Guan perhaps more than the rest bears that burden, as she struggles with the idea of marrying a man she doesn’t love instead of the man she does, philandering long time lover Zhao Shiyong (Huang Ming) and pays a tragic price for it. Once again Zheng Wei is caught between the safe choice and the passionate one when both Lin Jing and Xiaozheng re-enter the picture.

So Young would have been well served by ending before the misery of adulthood set in. The film’s first 90 minutes make for a complete enough film that the bloated, soapy final 40 become a distraction from Zhao and Li’s careful character construction earlier on. It’s been rumored that Zhao’s original cut clocked in at three hours, and so in that light the rushed, half-baked feel of the last act becomes clear. But even with more time the “adult” segment of the film feels out of place, tonally and stylistically. Thankfully Zhao makes the most of her cast, who carry the film farther than it has a right to go.

Producer Stanley Kwan, Chen Rong
Director Zhao Wei
Cast Yang Zishan, Jiang Shuying, Zhang Yao, Liu Yase, Mark Chao, Zheng Kai, Han Geng, Bao Beier, Huang Ming, Wang Jiajia
Screenwriter Li Qiang, based on the novel by Xin Yiwu
Executive producer Han Sanping, Zhang Jun
Director of Photography Li Ran
Production Designer Li Yang
Music Dou Peng
Costume designer Zhao Feng
Editor Chan Chi-wai
No rating, 131 minutes
THR

June 4, 2013

So Young (Variety review)

Filed under: Reprints — Tags: , , — dleedlee @ 11:19 am

So Young

JUNE 2, 2013
Maggie Lee

A lyrical ode to youth at its most fearless and foolhardy, “So Young,” the helming debut of one of China’s best-known actresses, Vicki Zhao (“Painted Skin: The Resurrection,” “Shaolin Soccer”), is accomplished on technical and dramatic levels. Harnessing a topnotch crew that includes Hong Kong master Stanley Kwan as producer, Zhao’s ’90s college romance throbs with an urgency and elan that mirror her protagonists’ heady experiences with first love. Even though the film’s momentum is halted by a messy coda, its overall exuberance will linger with the female target audience. Boffo domestic B.O. is still going strong, and the pic should shine in Asia-friendly markets beyond.

Having earned approximately $114 million locally in a little more than a month, Zhao’s Beijing Film Academy graduation assignment reveals a sure grasp of filmmaking fundamentals developed over the course of a 15-year acting career, yet still boasts the fresh voice of a newcomer. Zhao’s casting choices are particularly astute, as she offsets the star power of Taiwanese A-lister Mark Chao (“Monga”) and mainland pop idol Han Geng (“My Kingdom”) with the freshness of two lesser-known female leads, Yang Zishan and Jiang Shuying. The resulting performances offer a diverting mix of charisma and offbeat candor that only get dampened in the last 30 minutes.

The screenplay, adapted from Xin Yiwu’s romance novel “To Our Youth That Is Fading Away,” bears the hallmarks of scribe Li Qiang’s style in the way it depicts the Deng Xiaoping era with vivid detail and a nostalgic sense of yearning. The film strikes a magical note at the outset with an opening dream sequence that projects Zheng Wei (Yang) as several fairy-tale heroines; in her childlike imagination, she is both poor little match girl and spoiled princess. In reality, she’s a civil-engineering student newly arrived at a university in Nanjing, where she’s assigned to share a room with alabaster beauty Ruan Guan (Jiang), tomboy Zhu Xiaobei (Cya Liu Yase) and neat-freak Li Weijuan (Zhang Yao). Zheng catches the eye of goofball Zhang Tianran (Bao Beier) and rich kid Xu Kaiyan (Zheng Kai), but gets competitive with campus goddess Ruan.

Zheng’s real motive for choosing this college is to be near her childhood crush, a final-year student named Lin Jing (Han). Before she even has a chance to find him, however, he leaves to study in America; heartbroken, Zheng confides in Ruan, who proves surprisingly supportive. Later, visiting Xu one night, Zheng unintentionally gets into an argument with his roommate, architecture major Chen Xiaozheng (Chao), and the two become sworn enemies. When she’s unable to get him out of her mind, she realizes that she’s fallen in love with him.

Although the story’s various emotional entanglements are drawn from standard romantic tropes, the characters’ innocence and spontaneity, observed here with sympathetic irony, keeps the scenario from devolving into banality. Plunging headlong into love, Zheng is like a sweeter, less calculating version of the saucy, go-getting heroines seen in hit Chinese romantic comedies such as “Sophie’s Revenge” and “Finding Mr. Right.” Sure, she’s self-absorbed and temperamental. But considering the story is set in socially conservative early-’90s China, Zheng’s shenanigans, whether she’s making a scene to annoy Chen or throwing herself into his arms, manifest a level of courage and idealism in tune with the spirit of reform that’s shaking up the country. Yang, a force to be reckoned with, carries the film confidently.

Other distaff characters are also granted fuller personalities than one would normally expect from such supporting roles. In one wrenching episode, in which she bails out her wimpy, unfaithful b.f. (Huang Ming), Ruan demonstrates unexpected resilience and stoical devotion, belying her placid exterior. Meanwhile, hot-blooded Zhu, who can’t stand being looked down on, stands in memorable contrast to the shrewd, money-minded Li; both characters hail from impoverished backgrounds, and they embody different ways in which people of their generation deal with growing class chasms.

The acting is nuanced and involving across the board, although the male actors have a hard time making their mark, as they’re all playing hopeless wusses here. Chao fares best as the romantic lead, walking an intriguingly ambiguous line between nerdy and arrogant, aspirational and self-serving.

For 90 minutes, “So Young” has the spry, elegant pacing of a waltz, tightly embracing the viewer in its depiction of all-consuming love. Just when the drama reaches a high point with the characters’ graduation, however, the narrative jumps ahead three years; it’s clear Zhao intends to show youthful dreams crushed by rat-race reality, but it takes a lumbering 40 minutes to get the message across. Peripheral figures suddenly emerge to haunt the main characters, but it’s too late for the audience to become invested in them, and the gratuitous plot complications and excessive dialogue become emotionally exhausting.

Visually, there’s a stark contrast between the lustrous, vibrant colors of the campus scenes and the wintry, monotonous hues of the post-college era, practically severing the story into two films. Tech credits are otherwise excellent, especially Li Yang’s production design, which paints a charmingly retro picture of the grubby, crowded dorms and canteens of a Chinese university in the ’90s; the sets and city shots in the later reels have an anachronistic, contempo look. Dou Peng’s melodic string score, sparingly used, accentuates the film’s classical feel.

Reviewed at UA iSquare, Kowloon, May 31, 2013. Running time: 131 MIN. Original title: “Zhi women zhong jiang shiqu de qingchun”

Production
An H.S. Media (Beijing) Investment, China Film Co. presentation of a Pulin Prod. production, in association with Beijing Enlight Pictures, Beijing Ruyi Xinxin Film Investment, Beijing Maxtimes Cultural Development, TIK Films, Shanghai DuKe Books, Tianjin Lehua Music Cultural Broadcasting. (International sales: Golden Scene, Hong Kong.) Produced by Stanley Kwan, Chen Rong. Executive producers, Han Sanping, Zhang Jun.

Crew
Directed by Vicki Zhao. Screenplay, Li Qiang; based on the novel by Xin Yiwu. Camera (color, widescreen), Li Ran; editor, Andy Chan; music/music supervisor, Dou Peng; production designer, Li Yang; costume designer, Zhao Feng; sound (Dolby Digital), Zhu Yanfeng; visual effects, Spin; associate producer, Chen Rong; line producer, Zhang Qiang.

With
Yang Zishan, Mark Chao, Jiang Shuying, Han Geng, Zhang Yao, Cya Liu Yase, Bao Beier, Zheng Kai, Wang Jiajia, Huang Ming, Tong Liya, Pan Hong. (Mandarin, English dialogue)

Variety

March 7, 2012

March 7, 2012 [HKMDB Daily News]

CRI: Ning Hao’s “Guns N’ Roses” to Hit Big Screen

It focuses on the story of several Chinese youths who robbed a bank of the “Manchuguo”, a puppet regime formed in China’s northeastern provinces by Japanese invaders from the 1930s to mid 1940s. The Chinese youths became national heroes, Ning said at a press conference Tuesday in Beijing.

CF: New Trailer of Ning Hao’s “Guns N’Roses” Released

CF: ”White Snake” Portrays Woman Story in “The Locked Door”

Eva Huang’s latest romance “The Locked Door” released its first trailer. The movie will hit the national screens on March 8th, which is the International Working Women’s Day. Set its background during the Mingguo Period, the movie tells about the life story of a girl from noble family, who was raped at young age.

CF: Cinema Cashes in on Women’s Day

CF: Lead Actors Promote “Love Lifting” in Beijing

SGYahoo: Elanne Kwong praises Chapman To

CNA: A Simple Life review

Beautifully understated but not for everyone

Mabel Ye Xiqi (Anna Kay) plays a village teacher in “Blood Stained Shoes”

Ruby Lin, Ye Xiqi

Xing Minshan, Ye Xiqi

Stills from Feng Xiaogang’s “1942″ (formerly “Remembering 1942″) on location in Chongqing. The film tells the story of the famine in Henan in the 1940’s where 3 million people died of starvation and 30 million people were transplanted. The cast includes Adrien Brody, Tim Robbins, Chen Daoming, Zhang Hanyu and others.

Zhang Guoli (Sina)

Zhao Wei has quietly started shooting “Farewell to Our Past Youth” in Nanjing. It was also learned that pop singer Han Geng and actress Yang Zishan as joining the cast with previously announced Mark Chao.

Zhao Wei, Mark Chao

Han Geng

Yang Zishan

Yang Zishan  (Sina)23

CF: Ni Ni Graces FIGARO Magazine

MSN: Jacky Cheung denies rumours of wife’s sexual harassment

The singer emphasised that his wife was “not sexually harassed” but treated disrespectfully

The Hong Kong actress wants to get pregnant to deter fellow female actresses from “stealing” away her husband

MSN: Kelly Chen pregnant and in heels

February 27, 2012

February 27, 2012 [HKMDB Daily News]

Filed under: News — Tags: , , , , — dleedlee @ 12:43 pm

CF: ’LOVE’ Performs well in North America

Doze NIU’s Love has turned out to be a strong performer off a narrow platform release in North America.

New posters and stills from Carol Lai’s “The Second Woman”

Shawn Yue

Shu Qi

(Sina-gallery)

Zhao Wei, producer Stanley Kwan, writer Li Qiang and author of the original story, novelist Xin Yiwu, met with the Bejing press to announce the casting of Mark Chao in the lead for Zhao Wei’s directorial debut film “Farewell To Our Past Youth”. Without revealing the name, Zhao Wei said another important role would be played by a pop idol leaving the audience in suspense.

Stanley Kwan

Zhao Wei

Li Qiang, Zhao Wei

Xin Yiwu (c) (Sina-gallery)

Zhang Ziyi, wearing Elie Saab, attended the Elton John Aids Foundation Academy Awards Viewing Party

(Sina)

MSN: Cherrie Ying angry at Chinese actress for being third party

In a post published yesterday afternoon, Cherie wrote, “If any women still dare to send Mr Chan any weird text messages or photos, I will post your name and telephone number on my microblog! Did I make myself clear?”

The model’s microblog entry sparked speculations on her relationship problems with Aaron Kwok

February 13, 2012

February 13, 2012 [HKMDB Daily News]

CF: Poster of “Dangerous Liaisons” Released at BIFF

Zhang Ziyi, Cecilia Cheung Jang Dong-gun costar

CF: Interview: Restoring “The Monkey King”(FBA)

CF: “Nightfall” to Hit Mainland Silver Screens on Mar. 15

Starring award-winning actors Simon Yam and Nick Cheung, the film weaves violence, suspense, and true love tightly together. In the film, the crazy cop (portrayed by Yam) tracks down the newly-released prisoner (portrayed by Cheung), who wants to seek revenge.

FBA: My Way review

Unengaging, nationalist war epic, devoid of genuine emotion or real characters


CRI: Cast Members Promote Movie “LOVE” in Beijing

Zhao Wei, Shu Qi

Shu Qi

(Sina)2

Lin Chi-ling plays a mysterious woman in “Dwelling in the Fuchun Mountains”, now shooting in Beijing. Photos taken during a media set visit at a hospital garage dressed as a nightclub. Andy Lau drives an Audi R8 for the scene. (Feb.11)

Andy Lu (Netease)(Sina)2More

At recent appearance in Chengdu, Lin Chi-ling’s face appeared swollen leading to the usual speculations about plastic surgery. Lin blamed it on eating too many snacks and spicy Sichuan food.

(Sohu)(Sina)

Connie Chan promoting Hong Kong Film Archives “100 Must See Hong Films” in Yau Ma Tai’s Broadway Cinematheque

(Sina)2

January 3, 2012

January 3, 2012 [HKMDB Daily News]

FBA: Love Is Not Blind review

Charming, unpretentious rom-com boosted by subtle chemistry between its leads.

FBA: Legendary Amazons review

Old-fashioned, ’80s-style costume action with a miscast Cecilia Cheung setting the shaky tone.


Variety: Black Blood review

The Cathay countryside and its inhabitants have rarely looked drearier than in “Black Blood,” Zhang Miaoyan’s impressive second feature. Set in a hostile area beyond the Great Wall and shot in beautifully textured, black-and-white HD, the pic charts the downfall of a dirt poor family after they’ve started selling their own blood for money — and subsequent contracts AIDS.

FBA: Apple takes Hustle’s crown

Box office news

WSJ: ‘Apple of My Eye’ Sets Box-Office Record in Hong Kong

Over the weekend, Mr. Ko issued a two-page letter in appreciation of the movie’s Hong Kong fans, while the film’s two stars — Ko Chen-tung and Michelle Chen — paid a visit to Hong Kong. They’re headed to Shanghai to promote the film in China, where it opens on Friday.

Giddens Ko

Ko Chen-Tung, Michelle Chen Yan-si

Ko Chen-Tung, Michelle Chen Yan-si, producer Angie Chai, Giddens Ko (Sina)

Vivian Hsu sports cute buck teeth for Chu Yen-ping’s romantic comedy “Perfect Two”. It opens Jan. 23.

(Sina)2

Vicky Zhao Wei plays a sexy, warm, single mom in Doze Niu’s “Love”. This Valentine’s Day film is Zhao Wei’s first film since having a child.

(Sina)

Stills from “The Killer Who Never Kills” featuring Jam Hsiao, Chrissie Chau, Eric Tsang

Jam Hsiao

Jeffrey Huang Licheng

Chrissie Chau, all bound up

Jam Hsiao, Eric Tsang

(Sina), 2

Li Bingbing, Zhang Li and Xu Jianing attend the MV theme song release for Sun Zhou’s “I Do”

Li Bingbing

Zhang Li, Li Bingbing, Xue Jianing

Zhang Li (Sina)

A1: Cannabalism in HK drama - a matter of taste?

A controversial Hong Kong TVB drama series is alienating its core group of mature viewers, butis drawing new and younger fans to the goggle box with its creativity.

When Heaven Burns, a 30-parter psychological drama that explores the consequences of a guilty conscience, was massively panned when it started its run in Hong Kong last month.

“Most of them feel that they are already so tired after a long day at work, it’s a chore to use their brains to digest the content of a drama series.

ChinaHush: Female superhero Chinese Redbud Woman appears in Beijing (Bauhinia Heroine)

Another case of China’s Shan zhai?

Surely, a publicity stunt. But for whom, what?

Poster for Hong Kong film

Chrissie Chau as Bauhinia Heroine

Ethan Ruan, pants on the ground

MSN: Ethan Ruan’s nude photo goes viral

Ethan’s nude clip not only generated buzz for the movie, but also earned the actor the title of No. 1 eye-candy. His clip had since gone viral online.

Nicholas Tse: Cecilia’s still the mother of my sons (MSN)

The Hong Kong actor spoke on reconciliation rumours with ex-wife Cecilia Cheung

Nicholas’ father, veteran artiste Patrick Tse, admitted in an interview recently that the pair indeed had “an enjoyable time with their sons”.

Sceptics believe it to be a publicity stunt for the pair’s new films, pointing out that it comes at a time when both Cheung’s “Speed Angels” and Tse’s “The Viral Factor” are about to hit cinemas across Asia. 

MSN: Shu Qi responds to holiday rumours with Lee Hom

MSN: Miriam Yeung announces pregnancy

November 29, 2011

November 29, 2011 [HKMDB Daily News]

Variety: Shattered review

A microcosm of China past and present flows through Xu Tong’s intimate docu “Shattered,” in which the maverick indie filmmaker continues to refine his techniques and concerns shown in his previous “Wheat Harvest” and “Fortune Teller.”

CRI: Actress Zhao Wei to Make Directorial Debut

The film, provisionally entitled “To Our Youth That Is Fading Away”, will be an adaptation of the novel of the same name. It will tell the tale of a woman’s emotional struggle with two men whom she meets again many years after their on-campus love triangle.

CF: Vicky Zhao’s First Movie Project

Stanley Kwan will produce the movie. The film’s screenplay will be written by Li Qiang, whose 2005 film “Peacock” picked up a Silver Berlin Bear Award.

Based on the popular novel “To Our Youth that will Fade Away,” the story revolves around a girl named Zheng Wei, who becomes torn between two men; she is forced to make a decision to find her Mr. Right.

Cherrie Ying and actor Dong Dawei (Tong Dawei) are seen on the poster of the comedic road movie “Great Wall, My Love.”

(Sina)

Aarif Lee plays the role of a finance blog owner who places too many irons in the fire in return for first-hand financial information.

THR: Hong Kong Comedian Stephen Chow Voices Support in Chief Executive Election

‘Shaolin Soccer’ star sticks up for friend Henry Tang Ying-yen, one of two candidates for Hong Kong’s highest office.

The comic mastermind also had his own words of wisdom on the possible negative impact on public support for Tang after Tang was discovered to have engaged in extramarital liaisons.

Chow deadpanned, “We’re trying to elect a chief executive here, not to choose a boyfriend.” [Herman Cain might want to borrow this line.]

Chow’s unopposed election to one of 15 seats for the performing arts subsector on the next Hong Kong chief executive election committee came at the last minute on the day before the application closed, after original candidate, 1990s “Heavenly King” of the Hong Kong pop music scene and actor Leon Lai (Forever Enthralled), was found to be ineligible.

Lai’s disqualification to run as the representative of the election committee for the performing arts subsector had made a mockery of the whole election process of the next chief executive, which will be selected by a 1200-member committee – the singer-actor was not eligible as he was not even a registered voter.

After a slump of over a decade, Taiwan’s home- grown films are not only sweeping box offices at home but also winning awards and hit status overseas, thanks to a new cohort of filmmakers.

Director Chen Kaige is shooting his realistic Micro film “Search” in Ningbo of Zhejiang Province. Its scheduled release is in May of 2012. Chen will make three micro films before promoting them on the Internet.

Yao Di attending a launch ceremony in Sichuan for an 80’s-generation micro film (”Lost and Found”?)

Yao Di

Daniel Lee’s “White Vengeance” opens today in Hong Kong

Feng Shaofeng

Feng Shaofeng (Sina-slideshow)

Publicity stills for “Cold Steel’ featuring Tony Leung Ka-Fai

Opening Dec. 2

Peter Ho Yun-Tung (Sina)

The 32-year-old, who rose to fame as part of Taiwanese boy band Fahrenheit, quit the group in June and is now channelling his time into acting, having starred in best selling flicks like 14 Blades and My Kingdom.

MSN: Cecilia Cheng and Lucas Tse hides from the paparazzi (Nov.26)

In other related news, the media speculated that Cecilia had allowed Lucas to skip school again, because the pair was spotted in Shanghai for the past few days. (Sina)

Lucas at the play center

(Xinhua)

American-Taiwanese singer-actor Peter Ho was recently detained by the customs at an airport in China because the customs officers found that he was carrying more than 100 boxes of condoms in his carry-on luggage

Happy 37th Birthday to Lin Chi-Ling today!

(Sina)

Last night, with Huang Xiaoming in Beijing attending a charity dinner (Sina)

Lin Chi-Ling earlier this month

(Sina)2

October 14, 2011

October 14, 2011 [HKMDB Daily News]

Filed under: News — Tags: , , , , — dleedlee @ 4:00 pm

Too Much Heaven, Part Four: Taiwan Film Days at the San Francisco Film Society

CNA: Snow Flower and the Secret Fan (SG review)

“Snow Flower and the Secret Fan” is like a sports car with no engine - it looks stunning but doesn’t actually go anywhere.

CF: Shu Qi Likely to be the Next Bond Girl

According to the plot of the film, a Chinese actress is needed to take the role of Bond Girl who is not only sexy and intelligent, but also rebellious and dangerous.

CF:Leading Actress of ‘Magic’ Finally Revealed

After a wave of promotional activity, which managed to conceal the identity of the leading actress, Wu Qianyu’s face appears in the new trailer confirming her role in the movie. “Wu Qianyu [Karena Ng] has the chance to become next Angelababy!” producer-actor Bak-Ming Wong commented on the model-turned actress who is still not yet 18.

Karena Ng (Wu Qianyu)

Yan Ni plays a volleyball coach (Sina)

Poster for Love Never Dies (aka Blocked) (Sina)

Stills from The Legendary Amazons

(Sina)

Jeff Lau enlisted the aid of MV director Susie Au (”Ming Ming”) to direct a concert scene in East Meets West.

(Sina)

Zhao Wei, the Golden Rooster Awards ambassador, has shot an underwater video with a group of male dancers to be shown at the awards ceremony Oct. 22. Not known for dancing in public and afraid of the water, seeing her dance underwater is indeed a rarity. Zhao Wei spent more than four hours to shoot the video and perfect each movement.

(Sina)2

May 12, 2011

May 12, 2011

Filed under: News — Tags: , , , , , — dleedlee @ 3:24 pm

CRI: Shu Qi Not Feeling Beautiful in ‘A Beautiful Life’

A trailer has been released for Andrew Lau’s urban drama film “A Beautiful Life”, starring Shu Qi and Liu Ye.

CRI: Chinese Faces in Cannes

Chinese film stars including Fan Bingbing and Gong Li walked the opening red carpet of the 64th Cannes Film Festival on Wednesday, May 11, 2011. (Xinhua)

CF: Chinese Films Promoted at 64th Cannes Film Festival

CRI: ”Royal Tramp” Hits the Screens in 3D

CF: Zhang Yadong Eyes Non-commercial Filmmaking

Most Chinese people know the name Zhang Yadong from the songs he writes and produces for pop diva Faye Wong. But despite his renown, Zhang is a man who rarely speaks publicly, although he is regarded as arguably the best music producer on the Chinese mainland, and has worked with such Hong Kong singers as Karen Mok and Joey Yung.

CANNES Q and A: ‘Wu Xia’ Director Peter Ho-sun Chan (THR)

But as I always say to my director friends, you haven’t worked in Hollywood, the censorship there is even trickier. The only difference being the censorship in Hollywood is not imposed by the state authorities but the studios. The studio bureaucracy is much more troublesome than the Chinese bureaucracy. At the end of the day if you know all the rules about censorship and you try to work around the rules, then theoretically it won’t be that difficult to deal with. Every place has its own rules. Hollywood has its rules, which are business rules, and principles that are fuzzier.

CNA: Director Peter Chan blows 1.8m yuan to fly “Wu Xia” to Cannes

Airport arrivals - Cannes

Sandra Ng, Peter Chan

Takeshi Kaneshiro

(Sina-slideshow)

Michelle Yeoh hopes Suu Kyi biopic will raise awareness; film eyeing Venice premiere

Yeoh’s other upcoming release is the animated movie “Kung Fu Panda 2,” which is the first time she has lent her voice to a cartoon character. She is the voice of The Soothsayer.

Wong Jing’s God of Wealth Inn (God of Fortune Inn) is set to be released this summer. The film reunites Nicholas Tse and Nick Cheung.

(Sina)

Posters for Stronger Than Earthquake about the Sichuan Earthquake

(Sina)

Variety: ‘Mayday 3DNA’ rocks abroad

Taiwanese 3D concert film sells to three countries

Mark Lee’s scary “2359″

The Singaporean effort is produced by multiple award-winning producer Eric Khoo and is directed by Gilbert Chan, who preciously worked on “Love Matters” with Jack Neo.

Yuen’s latest effort will see him dabbling in films once again to strike gold with “Petaling Street Warrior”, the first ever Kung Fu comedy film to be shot and produced completely in Malaysia.

“Petaling Street Warrior” takes the setting in 1908, where a Hokkien mee seller named See has to face continuous extortions from the colonial police and Chinese gangs in Petaling Street, Kuala Lumpur while having a troubled (and sex-less) marriage to his wife, Zhung.

Zhao Wei was spotted yesterday at Shanghai’s Hongqiao Airport and lauded for her postnatal weight loss.

March 15, 2011

March 15, 2011

Pray for more rescues and reunions in the wake of the Sendai Earthquake.

(more…)

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